Blogging the Labour Leadership Contest Part 3 – The Sky News Hustings

The Labour Leadership Hustings on Sky News was rather interesting. I have seen so few campaign events this summer, because I thought that would be the best way to preserve my sanity, but I’m guessing that the slogans that the candidates used were identical to those at the other 7,284,357 hustings thus far. “Slogans” being the operative word – Adam Boulton only allowed each candidate to speak for thirty seconds. This barely gave them enough time to give a soundbite, let alone time to engage in meaningful debate.

Here’s my summary on how each candidate did, starting with who I found most impressive:

1) David Miliband

He’s articulate and animated, rather than passionate. There’s still an air of the Blairite about him and his policies, which he’ll probably never shake off. His definition of socialism (“we can achieve more together than we can apart”) sounds like something Blair would have said. Come to think of it, it could just as easily be a quotation from Glee or High School Musical. But his criticism of New Labour – that it was too top-down – was the most acute of all five candidates.

Another point of his that stuck out is his point on New Labour’s record: “If we trash our record, nobody will believe us in the future”, and listed some of the positive things Labour had done as a government, such as introducing the minimum wage and rebuilding schools.

It’s amusing that David Miliband still defends this record so staunchly when Tony Blair has already begun to trash it. If you were going to list ten Labour achievements, you’d be hard-pressed, but along with the minimum wage and Sure Start centres you would surely have the ban on fox hunting and the introduction of the Freedom of Information Act. Odd, then, that Blair should list these as his two biggest regrets as Prime Minister.

All in all, David Miliband performed best in the debate, and is probably Labour’s best chance for a win in a 2015 election. Although that begs the question of whether a Labour party led by David Miliband is worth electing. We’ll have to wait and see.

2) Ed Balls

He continues to impress in this leadership campaign. He answered questions well, wasn’t starey-eyed, showed a sense of humour and was good on the economy. One thing he said that surprised me: he relayed a conversation he’d had with Tony Blair while he was PM, in which Blair said he thought the average income in Britain was between £40,000-60,000 a year. Which is an astonishing anecdote if true.

However, the debate showed the problems Labour will have when they make points on the economy. When Balls and Diane Abbott spoke of the need not to cut your way out of recession, the Labour supporters on one side of the debating hall were applauding. On the other side of the room, made up of independent voters, but there were lots of crossed arms and silence. Labour’s biggest problem is on the economy, and one this blog will be returning to.

3) Andy Burnham

He is perhaps lucky that I was in the kitchen whilst the immigration debate was going on, because some of the things he has said on the issue have been immensely irritating. Nonetheless, he is a good communicator who spoke of his passion for the NHS and dislike of the 10p tax abolition, both of which are laudable.

“ELITES” is what’s written in my notebook from his closing speech. Labour needs to breakdown the London based elites and stop pandering to rich elites. Metropolitan elites were also mentioned by Burnham. Instead, Burnham reckons they should give the job to a Northerner. They won’t stop pandering to elites or make a Northerner Labour leader, but someone needs to say these things.

4) Diane Abbott

Ah, Diane. The token lefty. Not surprisingly, on this Unlock Democracy quiz, I matched up with her views overwhelmingly. But as a debater and potential leader she doesn’t cut it. I stopped listening to her eventually, and just watched her gesticulating with her pen, jabbing it towards the person she was making her point to like it was the world’s worst taser.

Before I stopped listening she got applause for mentioning she voted against Iraq and said she could appeal to Middle England because of her appearances on This Week (which makes you wonder what type of mushrooms she’d eaten that morning).

5) Ed Miliband

I’ve not just put Ed Miliband bottom because he’s a poor communicator. He comes across as a very intelligent man who struggles to put his points forward in clear, straightforward language – like Gordon Brown in that respect.

I also got sick of him constantly repeating himself. The others had a number of points they wanted to make, and generally answered the question directly. Ed Miliband twisted every answer into trashing New Labour’s record. “Courage to Change” was his mantra, and I wrote it in my notebook in LARGE CAPITAL LETTERS. It’s now etched into my brain. He not only came across as one-dimensional, but this line of attack from Ed is not credible, as I’ve pointed out.

Simon Hoggart was fond of saying that Michael Heseltine was excellent at finding the clitoris of the Conservative Party. Ed Miliband has spent his whole leadership campaign trying to find the Labour Party’s clitoris. If I may be allowed to persevere with this extremely inadvisable sexual metaphor, it seems to me that he is whispering sweet nothings into Labour members’ ears, about Iraq, civil liberties and everything else, not because he really means them, but because Ed thinks that this way he can get into the Labour Party’s knickers. Once that has been achieved, he will abandon his left-wing admirers, making them feel angry, hurt and betrayed.

Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Voting began last week, and the Labour leader will be unveiled on the 25th. At some point this week Hannah and I will be sitting down in our smoking jackets, drinking brandy and smoking cigars, and making our predictions on the Labour leadership race. Watch this space…

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